Feb
10
Sun
2019
Losar Celebration @ Centre Culturel Tibétain
Feb 10 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Artwork: Tomás Castro

Losar Tashidelek!

Lama Jigme and the Centre Culturel Tibétain wish you a Happy TibetanNew Year (Losar). May the year 2019, the year of the Female Wild Pig, be full of peace and happiness for all.

Please join us for a Losar celebration at our center!

Date: Sunday, 10 February, 2018
Time: 16:00 – 18:00
Place: Centre Culturel Tibétain
Address: 1, rue Charlotte Engels L-1482 Luxembourg

February 5, 2019, marks the beginning of the Tibetan New Year, and represents one of the most important Tibetan festivals of the year. The day is calculated astrologically according to the Tibetan lunar calendar, and changes every year to coincide with the annual lunar cycle.

We will be celebrating with food and drink as a potluck festivity:  please bring your favorite food and/or beverages to share! 

Friends, family and children are welcome to join us! We look forward to celebrating together as a sangha the fresh beginnings of the new year – may this new year bring auspicious benefit to everyone!

Jul
12
Fri
2019
“Little Tibet” in Cinema Utopia @ Ciné Utopia
Jul 12 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

The Centre Culturel Tibétain is happy to announce that it is organizing a special cinema event on Friday, 12th July 2019, in Ciné Utopia, with the presence of filmmaker and actor Sonam (Nawang N. Anja-Tsang).

“Little Tibet” is a documentary by Nawang N. Anja-Tsang and Joseph Brett, published on April 5, 2011.

In this movie Sonam goes on a journey to one of the highest places on earth in search of Tibet outside of Tibet.
 
Trailer: https://youtu.be/HYRjQPMDjAs

Venue: Ciné Utopia, 16, Avenue de la Faïencerie,
                L-1510 Luxembourg, Salle 5
Time:   18h30 – 21h00 – Movie Little Tibet and Q&A with
                filmmaker and actor Sonam (Nawang N. Anja-Tsang)
Price:  10 €
Language: English

No registration needed. Tickets can be bought at the theatre; cash payments only.
 
Part of the profit will go to the Golog Support Foundation.
 

Oct
6
Sun
2019
Thangka Painting Workshop – 6 October 2019 @ Youth Hostel in Luxembourg
Oct 6 @ 10:30 am – 4:30 pm

The Centre Culturel Tibétain is happy to invite you once more to a Thangka painting workshop led by Tharpen Lingtsang, the son of Gega Lama, on 6 October 2019. 

Teacher:  Tharpen Lingtsang
Date: Sunday, 6 October, 10:30 to 16:30
Venue:  Youth Hostel in Luxembourg – 2 Rue du Fort Olisy, 2261 Luxembourg
Language: The workshop will be given in English

Price:  65 euros (58 euros for regular members, 48 euros for donating members).
Lunch & drawing/painting material is not included in the price.

Please confirm your presence by transferring the indicated fees to the Centre’s account:

IBAN: LU79 1111 2413 8246 0000 / BIC: CCPLLULL,
Centre Culturel Tibétain, Asbl
Reference: Thangka painting 2019

Kindly let us know if you intend to have lunch at the hostel, for 9,90 euros, because we will need to book in advance.

You will need the the following materials:
Normal A4 or A3 paper, pencil/rubber, ruler, brush size 0 or 00 and black ink (encre de chine).
Advanced students can bring their drawings or paintings and the appropriate materials they are working with.

Please register by sending an email to events@tibetculture.lu before 22 September 2019.

Please notice that we need a minimum of 10 participants for this event to take place.

Karma Gardri
Karma Gardri is one of the most prestigious old traditions of Thangka painting dating back to 16th century Tibet and founded by the great incarnate master Namkha Tashi. “Karma Gardri” (karma sgar bris) or the “camp style” of the Karma Kagyu School of Buddhism historically holds a strong connection with the lineage of the spiritual head of the Karma Kagyu School, the Karmapa. The 10th Karmapa Choying Dorje (chos dbyings rdo rje, 1604-1674) was one of the most outstanding artists among the Karmapa incarnations and one of the schools he trained in was the Karma Gardri. When the Karma Gardri tradition came into existence it brought together the most excellent features of the Tibetan, Chinese and Indian schools of iconography, leading to an exquisitely refined style with a delicate series of exact proportions to be used for each different deity.

Gega Lama
Gega Lama (1931-1996) was the renowned and much loved master of Karma Gardri Thangka painting who brought this tradition to India when he fled his home country Tibet in 1959 to escape from the Chinese invasion.
Born in the small village of Rinchen Ling in the district of Upper Lingkar, Eastern Tibet, Gega Lama started his training at the age of eight with calligraphy lessons and received further education in Buddhist doctrine, dance, painting and music when he entered the monastery of Chokor Namgyal Ling at Tsabtsa. In 1947, aged 16, he took up the study of thangka painting with the renowned master Thangla Tsewang. By the age of 22, Gega Lama was recognized as an artist in his own right. When fleeing Tibet at the age of 28, he had to leave his books, diagrams and other valuable resources behind in his home country. During his first years as a refugee in India, he learned the art of casting images, vajras, bells, and so forth in bell-metal and bronze with the artisan Damcho.
As it became clear that there was a growing demand for Tibetan Thangka painting, Gega Lama applied himself to rebuilding the invaluable body of diagrams and methods necessary to the painting of Tibetan Thangkas. In 1981 he wrote and published a unique and unprecedented complete guide book on the drawing and painting of Tibetan Thangkas under the title “Principles of Tibetan Art”, which was received with delight by experts and students throughout the world. He faithfully preserved and transmitted his tradition and taught many devoted students, including his own son and successor Tharphen Lingtsang.

Tharphen Lingtsang
Tharphen Lingtsang (1973, Darjeeling, India) Tharphen is the son of the late Tibetan Master of Karma Gardri painting Gega Lama, author of one of the foremost books on Thangka painting “Principles of Tibetan Art”.
Born in the north of India, where his parents established themselves as refugees during the 1960ies, Tharphen received both a combined Tibetan-Indian upbringing and a western education at an English Jesuit school. After graduating, age 18, he became a faithful student of his father’s with a strong wish to help preserve the sacred tradition of Karma Gardri Thangka Painting.
Gega Lama gave complete transmission to his son and for many years they worked side by side in their school and studio in Kathmandu. They taught aspiring students together, faithfully maintaining the traditional method of apprenticeship, and made numerous thangkas and frescoes. By the time of his father’s unexpected passing in 1996, Tharphen himself had been a respected master in his art for a number of years, and Gega Lama had asked him to make the illustrations for his second book, for which the manuscript was nearly completed.
In 1999 Tharphen married his Dutch partner Lakshmi Fransen, also a qualified Thangka painter of the Karma Gardri school, who had been a student of his father’s since 1989. Since then he has lived in The Netherlands with Lakshmi and their two sons and he’s taught Thangka painting courses in several Buddhist Centres across Europe. In between regular jobs and taking care of their family, both Tharphen and Lakshmi are dedicated to the work on Gega Lama’s books in the hope of further publishing and spreading the unique knowledge they contain. Next to preserving the traditional Karma Gardri school, Tharphen has also enjoyed creating a unique painting style of his own in which he blends traditional Tibetan Thangkas with adornments in the European Art Nouveau style.

Feb
28
Fri
2020
“Kalachakra – l’éveil” in Cinema Utopia @ Ciné Utopia
Feb 28 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm

The Centre Culturel Tibétain is happy to announce that it is organizing the screening of the movie “Kalachakra – L’éveil” on Friday, 28th February, in Ciné Utopia.

This is a documentary feature film directed by Natalie Fuchs and released in 2017.

Kalachakra means, “The wheel of time.” It is the highest initiation in Tibetan Buddhism. Rarely filmed, this initiation has long remained secret. The Dalai Lama gives this initiation for peace in the world.

As the film opens, a woman, lying on the grass, tells of her suffering after the loss of her sister when she was still a child. What is the sense of her life?
Immersed in the colorful and vibrant setting of Dharamsala, India, the woman and 3 other individuals from very different backgrounds come together to face their deepest fears as they approach the transformational power of the Kalachakra initiation. Through this film, we enter and discover an ancient and yet unknown dimension where death meets life, a dimension which changes someone forever.
 
Trailer: http://www.kalachakra-film.com

Location:    Ciné Utopia, 16, Avenue de la Faïencerie,
                    L-1510 Luxembourg, Salle 5
Time:          19h00 – 21h00  (entrance at 18h45)
Language:  French, English, Tibetan with English subtitles
Price:          10 €

Places are limited. No registration needed. Tickets can be bought at the theatre; cash payments only.
 
Part of the profit will go to the Golog Support Foundation.

Mar
1
Sun
2020
Thangka Painting Workshop – 1 March 2020 @ Youth Hostel in Luxembourg
Mar 1 @ 10:30 am – 4:30 pm

The Centre Culturel Tibétain is happy to invite you once more to a Thangka painting workshop led by Tharpen Lingtsang, the son of Gega Lama, on 1 March 2020. 

Teacher:  Tharpen Lingtsang
Date: Sunday, 1 March, 10:30 to 16:30
Venue:  Youth Hostel in Luxembourg – 2 Rue du Fort Olisy, 2261 Luxembourg
Language: The workshop will be given in English

Price:  65 euros (58 euros for regular members, 48 euros for donating members).
Lunch & drawing/painting material is not included in the price.

Please confirm your presence by transferring the indicated fees to the Centre’s account:

IBAN: LU79 1111 2413 8246 0000 / BIC: CCPLLULL,
Centre Culturel Tibétain, Asbl
Reference: Thangka painting 2020

Kindly let us know if you intend to have lunch at the hostel, for 9,90 euros, because we will need to book in advance.

You will need the the following materials:
Normal A4 or A3 paper, pencil/rubber, ruler, brush size 0 or 00 and black ink (encre de chine).
Advanced students can bring their drawings or paintings and the appropriate materials they are working with.

Please register by sending an email to events@tibetculture.lu as soon as possible.

Please notice that we need a minimum of 10 participants for this event to take place.

Karma Gardri
Karma Gardri is one of the most prestigious old traditions of Thangka painting dating back to 16th century Tibet and founded by the great incarnate master Namkha Tashi. “Karma Gardri” (karma sgar bris) or the “camp style” of the Karma Kagyu School of Buddhism historically holds a strong connection with the lineage of the spiritual head of the Karma Kagyu School, the Karmapa. The 10th Karmapa Choying Dorje (chos dbyings rdo rje, 1604-1674) was one of the most outstanding artists among the Karmapa incarnations and one of the schools he trained in was the Karma Gardri. When the Karma Gardri tradition came into existence it brought together the most excellent features of the Tibetan, Chinese and Indian schools of iconography, leading to an exquisitely refined style with a delicate series of exact proportions to be used for each different deity.

Gega Lama
Gega Lama (1931-1996) was the renowned and much loved master of Karma Gardri Thangka painting who brought this tradition to India when he fled his home country Tibet in 1959 to escape from the Chinese invasion.
Born in the small village of Rinchen Ling in the district of Upper Lingkar, Eastern Tibet, Gega Lama started his training at the age of eight with calligraphy lessons and received further education in Buddhist doctrine, dance, painting and music when he entered the monastery of Chokor Namgyal Ling at Tsabtsa. In 1947, aged 16, he took up the study of thangka painting with the renowned master Thangla Tsewang. By the age of 22, Gega Lama was recognized as an artist in his own right. When fleeing Tibet at the age of 28, he had to leave his books, diagrams and other valuable resources behind in his home country. During his first years as a refugee in India, he learned the art of casting images, vajras, bells, and so forth in bell-metal and bronze with the artisan Damcho.
As it became clear that there was a growing demand for Tibetan Thangka painting, Gega Lama applied himself to rebuilding the invaluable body of diagrams and methods necessary to the painting of Tibetan Thangkas. In 1981 he wrote and published a unique and unprecedented complete guide book on the drawing and painting of Tibetan Thangkas under the title “Principles of Tibetan Art”, which was received with delight by experts and students throughout the world. He faithfully preserved and transmitted his tradition and taught many devoted students, including his own son and successor Tharphen Lingtsang.

Tharphen Lingtsang
Tharphen Lingtsang (1973, Darjeeling, India) Tharphen is the son of the late Tibetan Master of Karma Gardri painting Gega Lama, author of one of the foremost books on Thangka painting “Principles of Tibetan Art”.
Born in the north of India, where his parents established themselves as refugees during the 1960ies, Tharphen received both a combined Tibetan-Indian upbringing and a western education at an English Jesuit school. After graduating, age 18, he became a faithful student of his father’s with a strong wish to help preserve the sacred tradition of Karma Gardri Thangka Painting.
Gega Lama gave complete transmission to his son and for many years they worked side by side in their school and studio in Kathmandu. They taught aspiring students together, faithfully maintaining the traditional method of apprenticeship, and made numerous thangkas and frescoes. By the time of his father’s unexpected passing in 1996, Tharphen himself had been a respected master in his art for a number of years, and Gega Lama had asked him to make the illustrations for his second book, for which the manuscript was nearly completed.
In 1999 Tharphen married his Dutch partner Lakshmi Fransen, also a qualified Thangka painter of the Karma Gardri school, who had been a student of his father’s since 1989. Since then he has lived in The Netherlands with Lakshmi and their two sons and he’s taught Thangka painting courses in several Buddhist Centres across Europe. In between regular jobs and taking care of their family, both Tharphen and Lakshmi are dedicated to the work on Gega Lama’s books in the hope of further publishing and spreading the unique knowledge they contain. Next to preserving the traditional Karma Gardri school, Tharphen has also enjoyed creating a unique painting style of his own in which he blends traditional Tibetan Thangkas with adornments in the European Art Nouveau style.